CNBC’S “CRIME INC #6 – A DEADLY HIGH” WILL PREMIERE ON THURSDAY, AUGUST 2ND (ALL TIMES ARE IN ET)

CNBC

Thursday, 8/2/2012:
8:00 PM CRIME INC #6 – A DEADLY HIGH
9:00 PM CRIME INC #6 – A DEADLY HIGH
12:00 AM CRIME INC #6 – A DEADLY HIGH

FOR TV HIGHLIGHTS CONSIDERATION:

CRIME INC.:

Series takes viewers inside the biggest criminal enterprises in the world.

CRIME INC.: A DEADLY HIGH– Thursday, August 2

Correspondent: Carl Quintanilla

They go by names like Bath Salts, Spice, Herbal Incense and even Plant Food, but there’s nothing natural about these products. They are a new breed of synthetic drugs, created in laboratories and designed to mimic the effects of marijuana, cocaine, Ecstasy and crystal meth. They’re cheap, dangerous, legal and easily accessible at gas stations, head shops and online for as little as $20. Despite a warning label that reads “Not for Human Consumption,” an increasing number of people are using these drugs, often with tragic consequences.

Crime Inc. explores an industry that earns an estimated five billion dollars a year and that critics charge is selling deadly products directly to kids. Karen Dobner tells the story of her 19- year- old son Max, who was killed in a car accident, driving at 100 mph after taking a new drug called I-Aroma.

To learn more about who’s selling these products, Crime Inc. profiles Rick Broider, a former National Guardsman and father of six. Today, Broider manufactures synthetic drugs in New Hampshire, and tells Correspondent Carl Quintanilla that most of the people who buy his products simply use them as incense. Quintanilla also tells the story of Last Place on Earth, a store in Minnesota that earns an estimated $16,000 a day selling synthetic pot and stimulants with names like Role-x Watch Cleaner and Water Pipe Cleaner.

Through undercover operations and raids in Louisiana and Alabama, cameras capture the challenges in stopping the sale of synthetic drugs. Though 41 states have attempted to ban or limit the sales, these dangerous highs are still in great demand, with new, ever more lethal blends introduced every year.

********************

Following are videos from CNBC’s Crime Inc.: A Deadly High:

A New Breed of Drugs
http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000105541
Cheap, easy to find and increasingly dangerous, a new breed of drugs has quietly taken this country by storm. These synthetic drugs aren’t dealt on street corners — they’re available on store shelves.

Last Place on Earth
http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000105544
Last Place on Earth is a Minnesota store earning an estimated $16,000 a day selling synthetic pot and stimulants with names like Role-X Watch Cleaner and Water Pipe Cleaner, according to owner Jim Carlson. The store located in Duluth opens with lines of customers around the block every morning.

Crime Inc: Synthetic Drugs
http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000104429
On February 1, 2012, the Selma Police department in Alabama raided a local gas station and confiscated more than $15,000 worth of a new grade of synthetic marijuana called the Blue Bomb. Detective Kendall Thomas describes what was found.

Warning: Synthetic Drugs
http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000104409
Chief William T. Riley, Selma Police Department, discusses the successful raid of a Selma, Alabama gas station where synthetic drugs were confiscated and explains how police warned local stores about the new breed of drugs.

CNBC’S “CRIME INC #6 – A DEADLY HIGH” WILL PREMIERE ON THURSDAY, AUGUST 2ND (ALL TIMES ARE IN ET)